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What is the CECD? 
The CECD is an AHRC funded research group dedicated to examining the evolutionary underpinnings of human cultural behaviour, past and present. more>

   
Page Title - people
Research Fellows Profile
Dr Sue Colledge
NERC PDRA, Institute of Archaeology, University College London

31-34 Gordon Square
London
WC1H 0PY
Tel: +44 (0) 20 7679 4763
Fax: +44 (0) 20 7383 2572
Email: s.colledge@ucl.ac.uk

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Funding
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Research and Teaching interests
My research has centred on early prehistoric sites in the Near East (e.g. in Cyprus, Syria, Jordan and Turkey). I have studied archaeobotanical remains recovered from several Epipalaeolithic and Pre Pottery Neolithic sites with the aim of assessing the impact of the inception of cultivation and of the introduction of domestic crops. My interests include the application of quantitative methods (e.g. multivariate analysis) as a means to assessing the extent of use of the landscape and of its plant resources through time.
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Educational Background
BSc Birmingham University
PhD Sheffield University
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Associated AHRC CEACB Projects (Phase 1):
Project 017
The origin and spread of Neolithic plant economies in the Near East and Europe

Associated Publications - AHRC CEACB - phase 1:
Colledge, S., J. Conolly and S.J. Shennan (2004).
Comparative analysis of archaeobotanical assemblages from Aceramic Neolithic sites in the eastern Mediterranean: Implications for the routes and timings of early agricultural expansion.Current Anthropology. Vol 45. S35-S58.
Colledge, S (2004).
Reappraisal of the archaeobotanical evidence for the emergence and dispersal of the founder crops.E. Peltenburg (ed.). Neolithic Revolution! New perspectives on south-west Asia in the light of recent discoveries in Cyprus. CBRL Monograph. 49-60.
Colledge, S (2002).
Identifying pre-domestication cultivation in the archaeobotanical record using multivariate analysis: presenting the case for quantification.R. Cappers, S. Bottema & U. Baruch (eds.). The Transition from Foraging to Farming in Southwest Asia. Berlin: ex orient. 141-152.